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“There's a temptation for all of us to blame failures on factors outside our control — the enemy was ten feet tall, we weren't treated fairly, or it was an impossible task to begin with. There's also comfort in doubling down on proven processes regardless of their efficacy. Few of us are criticized if we faithfully do what has worked many times before. But feeling comfortable or dodging criticism should not be our measure of success. There's likely a place in paradise for people who tried hard, but what really matters is succeeding. If that requires you to change, that's your mission.”

General Stanley A. McChrystal, U.S. Army, ret.
Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World

“All my life, man and boy, I've operated under the assumption that the main idea in running was to win the race. Naturally, when I became a coach I tried to teach people how to do that. Tried to teach Pre how to do that. Tried like hell to teach Pre to do that. And Pre taught me. Taught me I was wrong. Pre, you see, was troubled by knowing that a mediocre effort can win a race and a magnificent effort can lose one. Winning a race wouldn't necessarily demand that he give it everything he had from start to finish. He never ran any other way. I tried to get him to, God knows I tried... but... Pre was stubborn. He insisted on holding himself to a higher standard than victory. ‘A race is a work of art’; that's what he said, that's what he believed and he was out to make it one every step of the way.”

Donald Sutherland as Bill Bowerman in Without Limits, 1998

“Do not press a desperate foe too hard.”

Sun Tzu
The Art of War