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“During the drive, Andre told me about his divorce. I was surprised he'd been married, he was so young. He and his wife had split up, he said, over surfing of course. Chicks had to realize, he said, that when they married a surfer, they married surfing. They had to either adapt or split. ‘It's like if you or I hooked up with a fanatical shopper,’ he said, ‘I mean a total fanatic. You'd have to accept that your entire life would be traveling around to malls, or really, more like waiting for malls to open.’ I could see how his marriage might have crashed.”

William Finnegan
Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life

“After Vietnam and the stinging Washington scandals of the 1970's many [CIA] case officers feared local political entanglements, especially in violent covert operations. Many of them had vowed after Vietnam that there would be no more CIA-lead quixotic quests for Third World hearts and minds. In Afghanistan, they said, the CIA would stick to its legal authority: mules, money, and mortars. For many in the CIA the Afghan Jihad was about killing Soviets first and last. [CIA officer Howard] Hart even suggested that the Pakistanis put a bounty out on Soviet soldiers: 10,000 rupees for a Special Forces soldier, 5,000 for a conscript, and double in either case if the prisoners were brought in alive. This was payback for Soviet aid to the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong, and for many CIA officers who had served in that war it was personal.”

Steve Coll
Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001

“Running, one might say, is basically an absurd pastime upon which to be exhausting ourselves. But if you can find meaning in the kind of running you have to do to stay on this team, chances are you will be able to find meaning in another absurd pastime: Life.”

Donald Sutherland as Bill Bowerman in Without Limits, 1998