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“Yeah, well ya know, what's so funny is I thought the season was over and, ya know, things were calming down so I started taking some time off, and low and behold The Eddie comes around and, ya know, it's as massive as it gets. So ah, ya know, we train for, ah... life. Ya know, this is a way of life for me. And my training program is just for me to survive whatever happens, whatever's the next thing that comes my way.”

Makua Rothman

"When at a press conference on April 25th [1941] he [Franklin D. Roosevelt] was asked about public criticism that he was using U.S. Navy warships to escort convoys he insisted that ‘Patrols were not escorts. If by calling a cow a horse you think that makes the cow a horse,’ he quipped to the reporters, ‘I don't think so’. But of course it was FDR who was calling a cow a horse. When a reporter called him on it by asking ‘Mr. President can you tell us the difference between a patrol and a convoy?’ FDR shot back, ‘You know the difference between a cow and a horse?’"

Craig L. Symonds
World War II at Sea: A Global History, 2018

“When the Blount report was made public in July [1893] its shock waves rattled all the interested parties. To the extent that [Lorrin A.] Thurston and [provisional government president Sanford B.] Dole relied on [former U.S. congressman James Henderson] Blount's Southern heritage to color his view of the racial component of the situation, the Georgia planter blasted their hopes without mercy. After stating what credit the native Hawaiians reflected upon themselves with their high literacy rate, Blount went on to characterize the natives as ‘over generous, hospitable, almost free from revenge, very courteous, especially to females. Their talent for oratory and the higher branches of mathematics is unusually marked. The small amount of thieving and absence of beggary are more marked than among the best races in the world. What they are capable of under fair conditions is an unsolved problem.’ In his report Blount did not venture to advise President Cleveland on a course of action. His conclusions, however, were unmistakable: ‘The undoubted sentiment of the people is for the Queen [Liliʻuokalani], against the provisional government and against annexation. A majority of the whites, especially the Americans, is for annexation.’”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii