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“Ultimately, most Japanese Americans who volunteered for the war were formed into the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and were sent to Europe, where there would be no question of friendly fire. They saw their fiercest action in the Italian campaign. After the war, one tally revealed that of all Hawaiʻian service members killed in battle four in five were of Japanese ancestry, an imperishable monument to valor and patriotism. In fact, during the next run made for statehood in 1946 the Congressional report allowed that according to both Army and Navy intelligence not a single act of sabotage was committed by any resident of Hawaiʻi before, during, or after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The report went on to acknowledge ‘the important patriotic service rendered under the most critical conditions by all citizens of Hawaiʻi regardless of racial origin’. The U.S. Supreme Court reached a similar conclusion the same year when it finally ruled, rather after the fact, that wartime marshal law in the territory had been unconstitutional and was based on the mistaken premise that Hawaiʻian inhabitants are less entitled to constitutional protection than others.”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii

“But Hawaiʻi's social ills, poverty that is demonstrably an after affect — still — of the Māhele more than a century and a half ago, youth crime and disaffection that come of having one's cultural heritage ripped apart and never mended, the restoration of native identity and the just desire for the return of some amount of autonomy which for decades was never accorded a status equal to that even of American Indians, the natural environment that was nearly obliterated in the worship of sugar, and more, need to be not just addressed but comprehensively, meaningfully, and probably expensively, addressed. But they are not addressed by nostalgia for the chiefly days. People who espouse reincarnation always fancy themselves to have been Henry VIII or Marie Antoinette. No one channels his past to some humble, downtrodden, medieval plowman. In old Hawaiʻi, 999 people in 1,000 were kanakas, digging taro, netting fish, trying to hide their one pig from the chief steward, being throttled on an altar if their shadow crossed an aliʻi. Modern cultural sensitivity obscures an important fact: Hawaiʻi never was a paradise.”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii

“Hawaiʻians have often struggled to maintain the spirit of aloha, ‘the face of breath’, from the ancient greeting of inclining close in greeting and sharing the air. That is the most famous part of their culture and mainlanders have come to expect that of them. But Hawaiʻians have another important concept, Ho’oponopono, ‘reconciling’, the making right of a bad situation. In the ancient days there were ceremonies to achieve it, to cleanse the minds of anger or selfishness and to come together earnestly and in good faith, to rectify and satisfy. Hawaiʻi deserves to have it made right.”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii