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“It is easy to be judged a success when luck runs with the fortunate son. But when adversity strikes, the true measure of a man percolates to the surface.”

Sean Parnell
Outlaw Platoon: Heroes, Renegades, Infidels, and the Brotherhood of War in Afghanistan

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat . . . There is little use for the being whose tepid soul knows nothing of great and generous emotion, of the high pride, the stern belief, the lofty enthusiasm, of the men who quell the storm and ride the thunder. Well for these men if they succeed; well also, though not so well, if they fail, given only that they have nobly ventured, and have put forth all their heart and strength. It is war-worn Hotspur, spent with hard fighting, he of the many errors and valiant end, over whose memory we love to linger, not over the memory of the young lord who ‘but for the vile guns would have been a valiant soldier’.”

U.S President Theodore Roosevelt
Citizenship in a Republic
speech delivered on April 23, 1910, at the Sorbonne in Paris

“ . . . [Davita] Malo wrote a letter to Kenahu to pass along to the King [Kamehameha III] . . . ‘If a big wave comes in, large fishes will come from the dark ocean which you never saw before. And when they see the small fishes they will eat them up. The ships of the white men have come and smart people have arrived from the great countries which you have never seen before. They know our people are few in number and living in a small country. They will eat us up. Such has always been the case with large countries. The small ones have been gobbled up.’”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii