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“ . . . The missionaries, therefore, found themselves in a society where a sexual relationship between two males had no moral valence, and they wished to tread lightly in a new land but still preach their truth. Their somewhat prevaricating response was to translate aikāne, in their budding Hawaiian English lexicon, as ‘best intimate friend’, with no mention of its original context. This came back to haunt them in a demoralizing way when a subsequent eleven shiploads of new missionaries fanned out into new villages to spread the gospel, relying on the Hawaiian-English dictionaries provided them. Learning the language as best they could and relying on this translation, new preachers would sometimes announce to a local chief in their best, new Hawaiian the desire to become his ‘best intimate friend’, which was greeted with considerable surprise, not to say enthusiasm.”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii

“I would not expect to be able to sit with you in 12 months from now and tell you that we are at victory or near victory or even close to victory. What I would say is I would hope to be able to convince you we have an organization that is now focused and moving in the right direction with the right culture, so that you could then believe that this is the kind of effort that could be successful.”

General Stanley A. McChrystal, U.S. Army, ret.
My Share of the Task: A Memoir

“In 1993, the centenary of the overthrow, President Bill Clinton did the only proper thing to mark the occasion. On the behalf of the rest of the United States, he apologized.”

James L. Haley
Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii